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Just because you don’t see something doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.

Just because you don’t see something doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.

What you put your awareness on is what appears.

You have a sip of red wine. It tastes like red wine. (Fascinating, I know.) But then a sommelier tells you that there are hints of oak and cherry in the wine. On your next sip, you notice the oak.

Extensive research has proven that writing about what you kinda sorta know as if you know it helps you move from kinda sorta knowing to really knowing through writing about it because if you have to explain something you have to understand it.

The oak taste was there all along. But you weren’t looking for it, weren’t aware of its existence, so you didn’t realize that it was there. But it was there and it has been there all along. Does it truly exist? Of course it does and now you understand that now that you’re aware of it.

The sommelier is looking for different things in the wine than you are. In fact, you might not be “looking” for anything. Also, the sommelier has practiced again and again to sense what is in the wine–it’s his job.

What can you not see that might be there but you’re just not looking for it?

Learning to be more aware has many practical applications. What if you could better sense where pain was in your body and where it was coming from? What about a better sense of hearing? What can others see or do that you would like to see or do? Do they have magical powers or have they just been practicing and looking for what they’re seeing?

You have to believe it to see it.

No, wait, isn’t it you have to see it to believe it?

Back to basics. How is it that you don’t notice the oak flavor in the wine when you’re not focusing on it? Sure, if it’s so strong and you can’t miss it, that’s one thing. But what about the more subtle aspects of awareness?

Think about it for a moment. Where could you be more aware in your daily life that might make things easier or more pleasant or maybe just more interesting? You won’t know until you try.

About The Author

Bradley

I don't like to call them excuses. They're priorities. With a handful of exceptions, we usually have a choice in our actions. They just need to be prioritized.

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