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How much energy do you spend justifying what you’re doing?

How much energy do you spend justifying what you’re doing?

When you reach the point where you realize that you don’t need to defend your point of view, doors open.

Listen, watch, pay attention. How much do people try to sway you to their line of thinking? How much of that is them trying to justify their own agenda or beliefs? How much do they truly believe and know that what they are thinking (or promoting or believing or selling or even just talking about) is right or true or what you should believe?

How much do you do it?

If what you’re saying (or, again, believing, etc.) comes from, for lack of another way to phrase it, your mind, you might need to rationally and factually explain why you’re saying what you’re saying–or doing what you’re doing or being who you are.

But when the source of what you’re doing or who you’re becoming comes from a deeper place of certainty, from the heart, there is no longer a need to defend your stance as, to put it bluntly, you don’t feel the need to get confirmation from others, to put it even more raw: you don’t care what they think.

Defenseless as Power

How much energy do you spend justifying what you're doing? [Defenseless and joyful, Barneveld, Holland]

How much energy do you spend justifying what you’re doing? [Defenseless and joyful, Barneveld, Holland]

When you stop defending your stance, you’ll very quickly realize how much energy you have been expanding on defending your position. In fact, you will have so much energy (and lightness and clarity and joy) that you’ll wonder how you could even function having spent so much of your time and energy and force defending your position.

The path of least resistance is the one that takes little (or no) effort because you’re not doing it to please others, you’re doing it because it’s who you are. You cannot any longer not do it. You don’t need to explain, defend or promote your stance as it’s just who you are and what you’re doing and if you stopped doing it, you would stop being you.

About The Author

Bradley

I don't like to call them excuses. They're priorities. With a handful of exceptions, we usually have a choice in our actions. They just need to be prioritized.

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