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It matters less what you want to “do” when you grow up and more what you want to “be” when you grow up.

It matters less what you want to “do” when you grow up and more what you want to “be” when you grow up.

P.S. This also applies if you’re already “grown up.”

At the end of this 13-year old’s TED talk, he admits that he doesn’t know what he wants to do when he grows up, but he knows exactly what he wants to be when he grows up.

I’m of the opinion that he’s right on target.

He knows how to get to someone who just wrote a book like “Every Single Day” where I ratchet up the importance of things like:

  1. Creativity
  2. Imagination and
  3. Writing

as an integral part of our daily lives. The kid is 13. It took me, ahem, several more years to figure out what he seems to already know, believe, and he’s living what he knows.

Every Single Day: Kids

Every Single Day: Kids

They say that you should write the book you’d like to read.

It’s almost 2018. I have a two series’ worth of books in my lineup that I can’t wait to publish. But there’s a book that I’d love to write, but I’m not sure (as of this writing), that I know how because I haven’t experienced it yet. The book I’d like to write is “Every Single Day for Kids.” Basically, if Every Single Day was for adults who are floating around not living their dream (but probably doing a terrific job of dreaming their dream), they should make a daily effort to live their dream.

But what about kids? There are chapters called “Perseverance” and “Patience.” Kids don’t want to read that kind of stuff. Hell, kids don’t want to read much period. How could I build an ESD Kids environment that could inspire kids towards motivation?

There. I said it. That’s my secret “scary” goal for 2018.

Have a listen to the 11 minutes from a 13-year old who is hacking his education–and doing a fantastic job of it.

 

Oh by the way (SPOILER ALERT), what does he want to be when he grows up?

He wants to be what he is now: happy.

About The Author

Bradley

I don't like to call them excuses. They're priorities. With a handful of exceptions, we usually have a choice in our actions. They just need to be prioritized.

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