Select Page

Where do you get your story? How about from the source?

Where do you get your story? How about from the source?
This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Markree Castle

In researching the plot for The Leprechauns of Markree Castle, I asked two 10-year olds what it might be about.

We have the location, now we just need the story.

We have the location, now we just need the story.

They’re both reading The Hunger Games, so I figured leprechauns are going to have some stiff competition, but hey, if that’s what they’re reading, so be it. Here’s what I learned:

Secrets

We’re going to need a secret passageway from somewhere in the castle, maybe behind a fireplace or a huge staircase. It will lead to underground secret tunnels that lead all the way to the nearest village (which would be Collooney, Ireland). The kids find a treasure, but it turns out to the belong to the local blacksmith (who’s doubling as the night porter at the castle, which is now a hotel). But it gets more interesting as it doesn’t really belong to him at all but to a former king and it came from Markree Castle itself.

Leprechuans

Seeing that the title is “he Leprechauns of Markree Castle” and all, the kids meet up with leprechauns in the tunnels and they’ve been after the treasure for some time. They’re excited that you found it and they said they’ll even give you a pot of gold in return for finding the treasure. But the blacksmith is onto them and won’t give it all up that easily. He’s the night porter at the hotel so he seems to come out everywhere the kids go. He’s scary and they’re scared. But the kids and the leprechauns want to work together to get the treasure back to the castle.

Well, that’s what I got sitting with two 10-year olds for 10 minutes before they were nose first back in their books. Sounds like a good story to me, let’s see what I can make of it. Stay tuned.

Series Navigation<< Scribblings of Book #2: The Leprechauns of Markree CastleThis is going to be fun. >>

About The Author

Bradley

I don't like to call them excuses. They're priorities. With a handful of exceptions, we usually have a choice in our actions. They just need to be prioritized.

Leave a Reply

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares