Select Page

Steek je vinger op

Steek je vinger op

It means, “Put your finger up” or “raise your hand/ask a question.”

But I see it as a way to break through an invisible ceiling between you and the rest of the world.

On a language note, “steek” in Dutch can be translated into “stab” which gives it even more power. Another variation is “steek je vinger in de lucht” or put your finger in the air.

Google Translate

Although I’m a native English speaker and “raise your hand” has a more visceral meaning for me, there’s something about that pointy finger that makes it more powerful, sharper, and more…dangerous.

Because it’s “dangerous” to ask questions. You’ll immediately be “seen” in a sea of bodies not raising their hands. You’ll be physically higher up as your hand goes up with your finger and even your arm is probably raised up as well.

The Tallest Blade of Grass is the First to be Cut

But if you raise your hand (or your finger), aren’t you the one who’s going to be singled out? Won’t you then be the one the spotlight is shining on?

Yes.

Then the question becomes: is that the person you want to be? Do you want to:

  1. Stay at the same level of the rest (of the blades of grass, hidden in the lawn),
  2. Rise up above to be seen, answered, and possibly…cut off.

This is the difference between not asking a question and asking a question.

It comes down to so much more. It’s no longer about a question. It’s about breaking through, rising up, and daring to be different or taller or the one with his hand raised.

Or her finger in the air.

Steek je vinger in de lucht
Steek je vinger in de lucht. [Photo by Eddy Lackmann on Unsplash]
Series NavigationAsk and you shall receive. But you do ask, right? >>

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.