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D is for Drama

D is for Drama
This entry is part 4 of 26 in the series A to Z 2014

What’s a story without a little drama?

You have to have a bit of drama.

You have to have a bit of drama.

There are many elements to drama: tension, passion, expectations, patience, suspense. But all put together, or even just one element, and you have something building up, something going wrong (or right), but there’s something we’re waiting for or hoping for and we want to turn the page to see how it turns out.

a composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving conflict or contrast of character

I suppose this could have as easily been a “C” word as well: conflict or contrast. But there has to be some tension. It’s not a documentary about wood chips, there has some be some skin in the game, as they say. Take our fearless characters Li & Lu: are they going to get out of the cave? What’s down there anyway? Does someone live there? Are they scared? Are you scared with them?

a situation or sequence of events that is highly emotional, tragic, or turbulent

It doesn’t even need to be lots of drama, just enough to keep you wanting to know what’s going to happen next. That’s all, just a little, just a taste, or better yet, the piece of chocolate on the table that you haven’t yet tasted and it’s the last bite and you’d like to have it, but you’re not sure who it belongs to, so do you take it? Just a bit of drama. And chocolate.

 

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About The Author

Bradley

I don't like to call them excuses. They're priorities. With a handful of exceptions, we usually have a choice in our actions. They just need to be prioritized.

17 Comments

  1. Bonnie Gwyn

    Drama in story – marvelous! Drama in real life – not so much. πŸ˜‰ Great post! Good luck with A-Z πŸ™‚

    Reply
    • Bradley

      But if drama in real life can turn into drama in a story, it’s win-win! Or at least … lose win!

      Reply
  2. editorialstand

    Drama is a very evocative aspect of writing and certainly does keep the reader interested on the edge of their seat. Great post.

    Reply
    • Bradley

      I was writing for my kids and it’s hard(er) to keep them on the edge of their seats as they’re young, their attention spans are short, and they want/need constant action/involvement/something.

      Reply
  3. Nilanjana Bose

    Hello,
    Here from the A-Z. I would take the chocolate, I think. If no-one was around. Finders keepers, where chocolate is concerned. πŸ™‚
    Best wishes,
    Nilanjana.
    Madly-in-Verse

    Reply
    • Bradley

      I think I’d take the chocolate too … who’s going to miss a little piece? On that note, who would leave just a little piece? See, there’s already some mystery there.

      Reply
  4. tempestletrope

    Drama is what makes the writing pop. However, I sometimes enjoy writing “slice of life” stuff that probably bores everyone else to tears! πŸ˜‰
    I’m visiting from the A to Z. My team is participating with several blogs. You might enjoy the drama on this one: http://hickswyliedna.blogspot.com

    Reply
    • Bradley

      I love the “slice of life” stuff especially if it’s my life. πŸ˜‰ Then again, who wants to read that? Usually my family and sometimes that’s all of the audience I need or am even shooting for. I really enjoy writing sometimes as if it’s just for my family and even further on that note, for my kids when they’re older.

      Reply
  5. Shawn Yankey

    I love the layout of your blog. Great points about drama! I have bookmarked you and am excited for what’s next.
    Shawn from Laughing at Life 2

    Reply
    • Bradley

      Thanks, Shawn. I’m using a free theme called Canvas Kaapstad … ok, ok, disclaimer, I built it. πŸ˜‰

      Reply
  6. Carolyn

    I think that’s why they say that fiction is more truth than life is, even though it’s the drama of real life that feeds fiction. And I would take the chocolate! πŸ˜›

    Reply
    • Bradley

      ” … the drama of real life that feeds fiction.” is right on. We just need to translate it into words and scenes so others can get a glimpse.

      Reply
  7. StuHN

    As a Drama Teacher, I can appreciate this as well. Try doing scene work with young kids who think all drama has to be just an argument. Sigh.

    http://stuartnager.wordpress.com/

    Reply
    • Bradley

      I think a lot of American TV is about arguments and, as you say, kids think that this is what drama is. There’s other entertainment out there, ahem, like stage drama that’s so important for kids to experience. I’m also a huge fan of an educational (and very entertaining) Dutch program that my kids love: Klokhuis.

      Reply

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