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When the narrator is deeply connected to the author’s material.

When the narrator is deeply connected to the author’s material.

Should you record your books in your own voice as the narrator?

I’ve been back and forth as to whether or not to read my own books (that is, do the recording, be the narrator) especially since I know an award-winning audiobook narrator and we have talked about him reading my books–or at least one of them. But then I come across comments like this:

The narrator (not the author) has a nice voice and professional clear delivery but little connection to the content. I presumed the author must not have a great voice that she opted not to narrate herself. Big difference for the listener when the narrator isn’t deeply connected to the material. (review of another book, not mine)

Dear reader, I’m a writer. I’m an author. I love words, stories, and the impact they have on the reader. I’m also a reader. I’m also an audiobook fan–no, a big, big fan.

I’m currently recording my book “Every Single Day” for audio. My plan was to put it out as a podcast (I still plan on it). But my other plan was to have my award-winning friend read the book for the audiobook version.

But then I read comments like the one above.

Here’s the thing.

I love speaking. No, no, I’m not sure this is clear enough. When I read aloud, I have a connection to the words, the story, the meaning, the underlying architecture more than I do when I’m just reading words on a page. I like to think that this connection comes through when I’m reading aloud into a microphone. That my voice, the vibrations and tones and highs and lows, comes into your ears and give you some of what I’m feeling.

Not just what I’m writing, but what I’m feeling.

That’s what I want to get across with audio.

Am I taking this a little too far?

I don’t think so. I want to be a professional speaker. I want to be on stage. I want to read aloud, speak aloud, have conversations, discussions, and do it verbally.

I’m a writer. I love words. I love words on a page. But hearing the words spoken just does something different for me. I love it–maybe I love it more than reading the words on a page.

I have to read my audiobooks. I have to record them. When I do it, I’m a kid in a candy store. It’s fun, it’s play, it’s pure pleasure.

This is what I’m after:

Big difference for the listener when the narrator isn’t deeply connected to the material.

“Big difference.” That’s what I’m after: making a Big Difference.

When the narrator is deeply connected to the author's material.

When the narrator is deeply connected to the author’s material. This sorta looks like me when I do my laundry and connect with my favorite audiobooks. Sorta.

Series Navigation<< How $14.38 confirmed my future audiobook publishing strategy.Why my “Every Single Day” book as audiobook is even more exciting than the print or ebook. >>

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