Select Page

Why Spark? Why me? Why you? Why now?

Why Spark? Why me? Why you? Why now?
This entry is part 15 of 23 in the series Spark

What change are you trying to make with your offering?

Yes, I can get rather involved in the books I’m reading. Currently, it’s “This is Marketing” by Seth Godin. I can’t put it down.

This is Marketing (by Seth Godin)

This is Marketing (by Seth Godin)

It’s about your product, your business, your marketing, your customers, your message … in all, it’s everything.

He seems to make it so simple. Could it be so simple? He asks three questions.

  1. What change are you trying to make?
  2. Who are you seeking to change?
  3. What promise can you make to your potential customers?

I’m going to answer them for Spark. I’m going to go for a quick answer and then a longer one.

1. What change are you trying to make?

We step briefly out of our comfort zone, together with our kid(s), and we’ll reap the rewards of that courage for years to come. 

If I had eaten only green beans for a month, that’s what I would be writing about. Or running 10 kilometers every day for a month.  But in my case, I wrote a book with my kids–and it changed everything. My career, the continent we live on, the language we speak, the friends they have, their present and their future trajectories are forever altered.

For better or worse.

All thanks to writing a book together. That we did in a month. And the book didn’t win any awards or sell millions of copies. What we’ve been celebrating for years has been the side effects of doing a project. Together. With the kids. That’s it.

2. Who are you seeking to change?

Parents who want to have a more meaningful relationship with their kid(s).

I did it myself. It wasn’t all fun and games. It took work. But every ounce of that work was worth a pound of celebration.

I don’t want parents who feel they have to do this or think they might someday could possibly think of asking their cousin’s permission to maybe next time do something with their own kids.

I want parents who want a change and are willing to create something for it–oh, and involve their kids.

If the kids want to change, that’s a bonus, not a requirement. My boys don’t even want to change their socks…

3. What promise can you make to your potential customers?

Side effects. Mostly positive, probably some negative, but the majority of them will be unexpected. 

Oh, and those “negative” ones? That’s where we’ll learn the most, cry about while they happen, remember even longer down the road, and laugh about them in the future.

Have you ever noticed how the best travel stories are the ones where things didn’t go as planned? My plan is to not really have a plan except the plan to start and finish. But the path in the middle? As long as all roads lead to completion, I’m on board. I hope you are, too.

Thanks again to Seth Godin for “This is Marketing” as it’s helping me form what Spark is and will become.

Why Spark? Why me? Why you? Why now?

Why Spark? Why me? Why you? Why now? [Photo by Quino Al on Unsplash]

Series Navigation<< People like us do things like thisWhat if I’d like to be one of the people like you who do things like that? >>

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.