Select Page

Kids need to crash their bikes to learn how to ride.

Kids need to crash their bikes to learn how to ride.

There’s no instruction manual for bike riding for kids. 

Here’s a screenshot of my recent interaction on WhatsApp with my 12-year-old son: 

Ik kan mijn fietssleutel niet vinden.
Ik kan mijn fietssleutel niet vinden.

Translation: 

  • Dad
  • I can’t find my bike key
  • Found

Note the time stamp on the texts: 

  • 4:29 PM
  • 4:29 PM
  • 4:34 PM

In other words, he fixed his own world in 5 minutes. 

I should add that he called my wife (but she forgot her phone at the house so it rang and rang). Then he called me and I asked him where he might have lost it to which he replied, “If I knew that, I wouldn’t be looking for it.” and sure, he’s right. But what else am I supposed to say? 

We’re also in temporary housing right now and I have no idea in the world where an extra key to his bike might be. Excellent bus system here in Holland, by the way. Just saying… 

He said he would look for his key, pouted, then hung up. 

Then he solved his earth-shattering crisis.

All on his own. 

Just like that. 


This is an excerpt from “Spark: How to write a book with your kids–and why you should” due out…any day now.

Spark: How to write a book with your kids and why you should
Spark: How to write a book with your kids and why you should

At first I found this image for this post, which I rather liked, but the screenshot of the actual text won out.

Dad, I can't find my bike key.
Dad, I can’t find my bike key. Photo by Florian Klauer on Unsplash
Series Navigation<< Recipe for LoveSpark at “#1 New Release in ​​Parent Participation in Education” >>

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.